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Kenneth Todar currently teaches Microbiology 100 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  His main teaching interest include general microbiology, bacterial diversity, microbial ecology and pathogenic bacteriology.

Bacillus cereus bacteria.Print this Page

Important Groups of Procaryotes (page 10)

(This chapter has 10 pages)

© Kenneth Todar, PhD

Appendix

PHYLA OF BACTERIA AND REPRESENTATIVE GENERA

Acidobacteria (discovered 1997, mostly uncultured; abundant in soil)
    Acidobacterium (acidophile, moderate thermophile)
    Chloracidobacterium (alkaliphile, bacterial photosynthesis tolerant to oxygen)

Actinobacteria (Gram-positive; high G+C content)
Order Bifidobacteriales (found in large intestine of most animals)
    Bifidobacterium

Order Actinomycetales (important pathogens of animals; antibiotic-producing bacteria in soil)
    Actinomyces

    Arthrobacter
    Brevibacterium
    Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    Frankia
    Micrococcus
    Micromonospora
    Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Nocardia
    Rhodococcus
    Propionibacterium

    Streptomyces

Aquificae (hyperthermophiles; autotrophic hydrogen bacteria)
    Aquifex
    Hydrogenobacter

Bacteroidetes
    Bacteroides (Gram-negative anaerobes in oral cavity and colon)
    Cytophaga (unicellular; gliding motility)
    Flavobacterium

Chlamydiae (intracellular parasites; unique cell wall)
    Chlamydia
    Chlamydiophila (ex-Chlamydia)

Chlorobi (unicellular, nonmotile, anoxygenic phototrophs)
    Chlorobium

Chloroflexi (filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs)
    Chloroflexus

Chrysiogenetes
    Chrysiogenes arsenatis (one species; respires using arsenate as final electron acceptor while using acetate as its electron donor; found in anaerobic arsenic-contaminated environments)

Cyanobacteria (oxygenic photosynthesis)
    Anabaena
    Gloeobacter
    Nostoc

    Oscillatoriium
    Synechococcus

Deferribacteres (contains one Family- Deferribacteraceae)
    Deferribacter
    Deferrivibrio

Deinococcus-Thermus
    Deinococcus (resistant to radiation)
    Thermus (resistant to heat)

Dictyoglomi
    Dictyoglomus thermophilum (one species; anaerobe; hyperthermophile; digests xylose)

Fibrobacteres (ex Bacteroides; found in rumen)
    Fibrobacter

Firmicutes (Gram-positive; low G+C content))
Class Bacilli
Family Bacillaceae
    Bacillus anthracis

    Bacillus cereus
    Bacillus subtilis
    Geobacillus stearothermophilus
(ex Bacillus stearothermophilus) 
Family Paenibacilliaceae
    Paenibacillus polymyxa (ex Bacillus polymyxa)
Family Staphylococcaceae
    Staphylococcus aureus
Family Listeriaceae
    Listeria monocytogenes
Family Lactobacillaceae
    Lactobacillus acidophilus
Family Enterococcaceae
    Enterococcus faecalis (ex Group D streptococcus; ex Streptococcus faecalis)
Family Streptococcaceae
    Lactococcus lactis
(ex Group N streptococcus; ex Streptococcus lactis)
    Streptococcus mutans

    Streptococcus pneumoniae
    Streptococcus pyogenes
    Streptococcus thermophilus
    Streptococcus viridans
(pseudo) alpha hemolytic streptococci
 

Class Clostridia
Family Clostridiaceae (anaerobic endospore-formers)
    Clostridium acetobutylicum
    Clostridium botulinim
    Clostridium difficile
    Clostridium perfringens
    Clostridium tetani
    Sarcina
Family Heliobacteriaceae (anoxygenic photoheterotrophs; unique bacteriochlorophyll g; form endospores)
    Heliobacterium
Family Peptostreptococcaceae
    Peptostreptococcus

Class Mollicutes (lack a cell wall)
    Mycoplasma
    Spiroplasma
    Ureaplasma

Fusobacteria
(Gram-negative anaerobe similar to Bacteroides)
    Fusobacterium

Gemmatimonadetes (Gram-negative aerobe; replication by budding; one species described)
    Gemmatimonas aurantiaca

Nitrospirae (Gram-negative, nitrogen-oxidizing; helical to vibroid morphology; one species described)
    Nitrospira moscoviensis

Planctomycetes (budding, stalked bacteria; lack peptidoglycan in cell wall)
Planctomyces
Candidatus
(oxidize ammonia)

Proteobacteria (Gram-negative rods and cocci)
Alpha Proteobacteria
    Acetobacter
    Agrobacterium
    Bartonella
    Brucella

    Caulobacter
    Ehrlichia
    Gluconobacter
    Nitrobacter

    Rhizobium
    Rickettsia

    Rhodobacter
    Rhodospirillum
    Zymomonas

Beta Proteobacteria
    Alcaligenes
    Bordetella
    Burkholderia (ex Pseudomonas)
    Gallionella
    Methylophilus
    Neisseria
    Nitrosomonas
    Rhodocyclus

    Spirillum
    Thiobacillus
    Zooglea

Gamma Proteobacteria
    Acidithiobacillus
    Aeromonas
    Cardiobacteriium
    Chromatium
    Coxiella
    Francisella

    Halomonas
    Haemophilus

    Legionella
    Methylobacter
    Pasteurella
    Photobacterium
    Pseudoalteromonas
    Vibrio
    Xanthomonas

FamilyEnterobacteriaceae
    Escherichia
    Enterobacter
    Erwinia
    Klebsiella
    Proteus
    Salmonella
    Shigella
    Photorhabdus
    Xenorhabdus
    Yersinia
Family Pseudomonadaceae
    Azomonas
    Azotobacter
    Pseudomonas

Delta Proteobacteria
    Bdellovibrio
    Desulfobacter
    Desulfovibrio
    Geobacter
    Myxococcus

Epsilon Proteobacteria
    Campylobacter
    Helicobacter

Spirochaetes (helical, flexible cells; unique motility using endoflagella)
    Borrelia
    Leptonema

    Leptospira
    Treponema


Thermodesulfobacteria (thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria)
    Thermodesulfobacterium

Thermomicrobia (thermophilic green sulfur bacterium related to Chloroflexi)
    Thermomicrobium

Thermotogae (hyperthermophiles)
    Thermotoga

Verrucomicrobia (many uncultured, includes ectosymbionts of protists and endosymbionts of nematodes)
    Verrucommicrobium




END OF CHAPTER

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Kenneth Todar has taught microbiology to undergraduate students at The University of Texas, University of Alaska and University of Wisconsin since 1969.

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